CEGS for YEGS

There are several dozen CEGS (Colleges for Exceptionally Gifted Students) and many more accelerated high school programs throughout the U.S. Most are hybrid programs (bridging high school and college) housed on the campuses of public universities. Here are 10 selected CEGS that reflect the variations among the programs.

Bard College at Simon’s Rock is a private, coeducational, residential college in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.  There are 435 students on a self-contained campus 2.5 hours by car from both Boston and New York City. Students typically enter Simon’s Rock after their sophomore or junior year of high school.  Half earn an A.A. degree and leave after 2 years, while half earn a B.A. after 4 years.  Simon’s Rock was founded in 1966; the Provost is Dr. Mary Marcy.  The Simon’s Rock slogan says it best:  “No other college in the country does what we do.”

Missouri Academy of Science, Mathematics and Computing is a public, coeducational, residential program on the campus of Northwest Missouri State University. There are 170 students who enter after 10th grade and concentrate on the STEM disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics.  Students completing the 2-year program earn a h.s. diploma, an A.A. degree, and 75 college credits.  The Missouri Academy was founded in 2000 and is free for Missouri residents.  The Dean is Dr. Cleo Samudzi.

The Early Entrance Program (EEP) is a public, coed, non-residential program on the campus of California State University-Los Angeles (CSU-LA).  There are 150 students who enter between the ages of 11 and 16. They study with one-another the first year and join the University Honors College starting in the second year.  Those completing the 4-year program earn a B.A., B.S., or B.F.A. EEP was founded in 1982 by Dr. Richard S. Maddox, who has directed the program ever since.

The Program for the Exceptionally Gifted (PEG) is a private, female, residential (or live at-home) program at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia.  There are 70 students who enter between the ages of 12 and 16. While some transfer to other schools after two years, those who complete the 4-year program earn a B.A. or B.S. PEG was founded in 1985; the director is Dr. Stephanie Ferguson.

Massachusetts Academy of Math and Science is a public, coed, non-residential program on the campus of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. There are 100 students who attend the Academy after completing 10th grade and concentrate on Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics (STEM) courses.  Those completing the 2-year program earn a high school diploma and college credit.  The Academy was founded in 1992; its director is Mr. Robert A. Salvatelli.

The Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science is a public, coed, residential program on the campus of Western Kentucky University.  There are 120 students who enroll after completing 10th grade and concentrate on the STEM disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics.  After finishing the two-year program, students earn a high school diploma and 60 college credits. The Academy was founded in 2007 on the model of the Missouri Academy; the director is Mr. Tim Gott.

University of Washington:  The UW Academy and The Transition School. Both programs are public, coeducational, non-residential programs in Seattle.  The UW Academy accepts 35 students per year who have completed 10th grade; they start in the Honor’s College straight away.  The Transition school enrolls 16 students between 12 and 14 years of age in a one-year program to prepare them to enter the UW Honors College.  The Academy was founded in 1977 and the Transition School in 1980.  Taking over as director fall 2010 is Dr. Nancy Hertzog.

The Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science is a public, coed, residential program housed at the University of North Texas campus in Denton.  Students enroll after they finish 10th grade.  There are 380 students in the two-year program starting after completion of the 10th grade.  Graduates receive a h.s. diploma and 70 hours of college credit, having taken classes with the general college population.  The Academy was founded in 1987; its director is Dr. Richard J. Sinclair.

The Texas Academy for Leadership in the Humanities (TALH) is a public, coed, residential program at the Lamar University campus in Beaumont.  Students enroll after they finish 10th grade and leave after two years with a h.s. diploma and college credit. TALH nurtures leadership abilities through academic rigor, community service, public speaking, and other non-classroom activities.  TALH was founded in 1994; its director is Dr. Mary Gagne.

The Early College at Guilford is a public, coed, non-residential program on the campus of Guilford College in Greensboro, North Carolina.  Students enroll instead of starting 9th grade at a traditional high school, with 50 students per grade making a total of 200 students in the four-year program.  They graduate with a h.s. diploma and 75 hours of college credit. The Early College at Guilford was founded in 2002; its director is Dr. Bobby Ann Hayes.

The National Academy of Arts, Sciences and Engineering (NAASE) is a public, coeducational, residential program on the University of Iowa campus in Iowa City. The class of 2008 enrolled 15 students. Students enter after completing their junior year of high school, typically at 16-17 years old. The program began in 1999 and is directed by Dr. Nicholas Colangelo. Students take classes in the honor’s college with the older students. Tuition is $7,400 for in-state students and $24,000 for out of state students, with room and board $8,500 for all.

Boston University Academy is a private, coeducational, non-residential program for students grade 9-12. The Academy typically has 150-160 students who follow a traditional liberal arts curriculum. The school began in 1993 and is directed by James S. Berkman. Juniors and seniors take some classes at the Academy and others at Boston University itself. Tuition and fees are about $30,000. After four years, many students enter highly selective colleges and universities.

The Clarkson School is a private, coeducational, residential program on the campus of Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York. It is a one-year program for students who have completed their junior year of high school. Students have a mean SAT score (Reading + Math) of 1210; they take classes at Clarkson University as matriculated freshmen. Tuition and fees are around $17,800 per year, with room and board $5,700. The program began in 1978 and is directed by Headmaster David Craig.

The Resident Honors Program at USC is a private, coeducational, residential program on the campus of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Tuitiaon and fees are roughly $41,400, though students received a Dean’s scholarship equal to one quarter’s tuition. Room and board are $11,500. 20-30 students start their USC careers early (after completing 11th grade) by enrolling in this one-year program. The program is highly selective, with average SAT (Reading + Math + Writing) of 2200 and average ACT of 33.